Amidst all the Cluster

The silhouette of an Indian Cormorant, perching on the branch of a tree, during early hours of the day at Seawoods.

Cormorants are indeed amazing birds to watch. They are seen often around the different water sources around Navi Mumbai. Their favorite spot though seems to be the the lone poles that stick out of the water (at the holding ponds) where they perch on the top, spread their wings and often pretend to be ‘dancing around’, a behavior called ‘sunbathing’ or ‘wing drying’. There are many theories and explanations for this behavior ranging from ‘the dry of wings’ to ‘regulating body temperature (“thermoregulation”), though much of these are speculated.
But whatever be the reason for the behavior, these birds are indeed a charm to look at and just make your day.

Action under the Risin’ Sun

Two Gull Billed Terns take turns to scope out fish while hovering over the holding ponds at Seawoods during early hours of the day.

The holding ponds at Seawoods and much of the area, in and around the creek harbor a vast number of marine and aquatic species. The area also has a decent mangrove cover (which is slowly depleting due to many factors). Aquatic and Marine birds are often found flying in the region and the place is visited by migratory birds during the season.
But given the fact that these wetlands and similar natural hotspots (around Navi Mumbai) are considered as ‘wastelands’ by people, the place slows get ‘developed’ and much of the region turns into a concrete jungle. The quarrying activities at multiple points on the foothills of the Parsik Hills range, the MIDC area, the Palm Beach Road and Seawoods are some proofs of that ‘development’. While making way through the Palm Beach Road, one can often see signs like ‘Proposed Golf Course’ (near Seawoods or Akshar Building Signal) or ‘Proposed Public Maidan’ (before Nerul or BBQ Nation signal) which are put up by CIDCO. If these projects materialize, pictures like the one above would only be a memory and end up in archives of a long lost past. No, it wouldn’t be the final nail in the coffin but it sure would be step closer to that.
And after all it’s man who needs a coffin

Stretchin’ It Out

An Indian Palm Squirrel stretches itself out on the service shaft ladder during the early hours of the day at Mumbai.

Like most wildlife in the region, these small and cute rodents have witnessed a boom in population during the last few years. They are often seen doing daredevil stunts like scaling straight walls, from the bottom to the top and vice versa and often come inside homes, either due to curiosity or in search of food. Even though their climb to the very top possess a threat to them and they often end up battling for life with the Black Kites and Crows that try to pick them up, neither their population or their climbing seems to slow down.

Been Watchin’ You

BK at AN

A Black Kite perches on top of a building at Anushaktinagar during mid day.

These birds form the ‘Birds of Prey’ category in this area of Mumbai and are found throughout the city. From gliding over the massive dumps of garbage spread across Mankhurd to scouting the hills from several meters above with their ‘God’s Eye’, they do it all and justify their tag of ‘opportunistic hunters’.
P.S-One of my favourite incidents with them was when one full grown BK kept harassing a really angry feral dog, which it seemed to enjoy very much. It also had it eye on the dog’s meal that it had made from the local dustbin.

2017.01.30

The Walk

RM-The Walk

A juvenile monkey walks past the rooftop at one of the residential buildings at Anushaktinagar.
As a part of the deforestation activities and the rampant ‘development’ taking place in the area, the resident wildlife has no place to go but to share the space with the ‘developed’ humans.
Though there hasn’t been much of a struggle yet and the monkeys seem to be more ‘cooperative’ than their human counterparts, what lies next is something that has to be waited for and watched.
We are yet again proving to ourselves that we seem to have a poor memory and understanding about the fact that these animals were here first, even before we figured out what ‘science’ and ‘development’ even meant.

2017.01.20